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Southbrook Farms Limited

 

 

Bill Redelmeier
 
May 15, 2019 | Bill Redelmeier

Did Ontario Chardonnay Age?

This past Sunday, we did the retrospective of the Ontario Chardonnays that were poured in London in 2010. I must admit that I was a bit worried that some might be over the hill. They ranged from 2005 to 2008 vintage, and while they were all top notch in the day it was still a risk. As we Coravined the wines, each wine seemed better and better. The colour on all looked good, and the bouquets seemed fresh and youthful. The palates carried through with the same theme. I won’t go into them wine by wine, but overall they were in fine shape. Tasting older wines is a tough job as the characteristics you look for have changed. You drink young wines for their sheer exuberance, while you appreciate older wines as a contemplation. What was happening when these wines were young? America had a young, hopeful President, Canada was trying with our neighbours to work our way out of financial troubles and these wines were trying to show what Ontario was capable of in the world of wine.

The wines showed great depth of hazelnut, butterscotch canned peaches and fresh lemon. I would love to open any one of them to share with friends. My suggestion of matching with roast turkey or chicken was met with “ how about just on their own”? I would agree

My conclusions? If you have some quality Ontario Chard in the cellar, there is no rush to drink them. If you don’t have any in your cellar, you should rush to get some! If you are interested in trying this tasting, we will be repeating this twice as part of 4C in July. You don’t have to have I4C tickets to join us: more info will follow.
 

Bill Redelmeier
 
May 15, 2019 | Bill Redelmeier

Monarch Butterflies & Bees


Last Friday, I got to go back to my roots. I was invited to speak to a couple of classes of Kindergartners at a local school about Monarch Butterflies. This year we have given out over 1,000 packs of seeds. The response was amazing, and we hope everyone will send us lots of pictures.
Many of you remember that Southbrook started in Richmond Hill as a roadside stand in the 1980’s. One of our biggest crops was pumpkins. Each year would welcome about 10,000 school kids, from Kindergarten to grade 4 out to the patch to walk in the field and learn about farming and nature.



What do you talk about to a class of very young children? You can't go into great detail, even though these kids knew a lot more than I expected (They had some very involved and dedicated teachers). I talked about the importance of milkweed and how amazing the butterflies are. I told them how not only butterflies are important, but bees are as well. I showed them Carol Pasternak’s great book: How To Raise Monarch Butterflies, and our new Solitary Bee House.​

 

 

What was I trying to get across ? I told them that the big people in their lives like their parents have to pay attention to the big things like jobs, homes and cars. I told them that means they have to look out for the little things like Butterflies and Bees. I also told them that because they are little, it’s easier for them to look down so they can see what is happening on the earth

People ask me what they can do. All of life’s problems seem so huge: climate change or energy use as examples and anything that I can do seems so unimportant. We can all do something important. Whether it is talking to kids, planting a diverse butterfly garden or thinking about cutting back on waste (do I really need that straw? ), it is all significant. Every step is important, especially if we tell others what we are doing and why.